songofcopper: (fred)
[For anyone who has not encountered Meredith previously, let me explain him this way: he is my favourite character. He first visited me when I was fifteen-and-a-half years old (!) and has been ineradicably present ever since. I am fonder of him than I am of some family members. (This will, I'm sure, make sense to all writers of fiction.) Over the years he and I have sort of moulded one another, if that is not too horrid a phrase, so that now, when I look back, I cannot think of us as 'two sides of the same coin' but as something more like 'a forever-entangled wave 'n' particle combo'.]

On the frivolously-solemn occasion of Meredith’s birthday, not to mention it being our twentieth year of mutual mischief, I feel it is highly appropriate to give him the thing he most adores: Attention.

Boswell attends inevitably upon Johnson )
songofcopper: (Da Zess!)
This, this, THIS is Way Cool. Charles Hayward giving a mini-tour of his drumming-lair and his drum kit.



I love how all of his drums are old friends (he's still using his first snare drum, although it's a bit like when King Alfred's Axe Danced with the Prince of Wales, what with replacement parts etc). He even has a saucepan lid, picked up as a trophy after giving a drum class to a nursery school. This is greatly reassuring in a world where gear-obsessives are two-a-penny - you know, guitarists with 53 guitars and only one pair of hands, that kinda thing. Just as a bad workman blames his tools, a good musician can make music with anything. I bet that somewhere, right now, there is a child bashing a saucepan who will grow up to be a champion saucepan-basher in the Hayward mould!

But the best musicians can make music even with... nothing. Very interesting what Mr H says about the drum kit describing a negative space that makes the shape of himself. Anyone can press a button and have rhythm dispensed by machine, he says, but to play drums is PHYSICAL. The outline of the kit measures his reach. It's a bit like a spider's web. Every vibration tells.

And at the end of this short film, he plays, and he doesn't do that lame-oid I Am Zee Drummer routine of 'start with a pedestrian beat, then break it down a little, then show off a whole lot, then play everything as loud and as fast as humanly possible whilst making the Musician-Face... aaaand GONG STRIKE!' Instead, as he goes on, he leaves little negative spaces in the rhythm. I would say that this is how you demonstrate musicianly heft. If you can use silence just as well as you can use sound, and if you can involve your audience actively in following the grammar of the rhythm (rather than serving it up in predictable fashion), you are Doing Something. Perhaps what you are doing is using the fourth dimension to make a shape that implies the other three - rhythmic architecture. As opposed to those others who are still at the 'draw a rectangle' stage.

Plus, instead of the Musician-Face, he wears a Smile of Ultimate Contentment. To get lost in between the notes Is It.

Mr Hayward definitely makes my list of People I'd Happily Live Next Door To.

[Notice to Patrons: apologies for recent absence. I am still writing a biggish entry about my trip abroad - haven't felt very motivated to finish it, hence radio silence. But then today I saw this video and couldn't help but Say Things about it... ibble-glibble. ^_^ I'd better catch up with commenting I think, whilst I'm in a talkative mood... >.<]
songofcopper: (disdainful domination!)
I saw this recently, and fell slightly in love:



That is Peter Cook bedazzling up a storm there. ^_^  I've never been that enamoured of Peter Cook, he always comes across as being too clever by half and a bit... I dunno... hard-hearted. :-\  But here, he demonstrates how alluring aloofness can be!  Is anyone else swooning...?

Mustn't forget, though, that Dudley Moore composed the score.  All the music is great, from start to finish.

The whole film (Bedazzled) is really good, much better by far than the remake.  Even though it's funny and the humour is quite silly in places (trampolining nuns, anyone?!), it has a melancholy quality to it, too.  I suppose even in the super-optimistic 60s, not everybody felt that the times they were a-changin' for the better.  We may have grand ideas and noble aims in this life, but what if all the involuntary, petty, split-second moments of anger, cruelty, venality and greed that pepper our larger strivings add up to damnation?  If not perhaps in any kind of afterlife, they probably do in this one...  If the road to Hell really is paved with good intentions, this film puts that across really well - be careful (and very precise about) what you wish for, folks! ;-)

And in the meantime, distracting oneself with amusing films and clever musical parodies is as soothing a balm as I have yet found. ^_^
songofcopper: (disdainful domination!)
I saw this recently, and fell slightly in love:



That is Peter Cook bedazzling up a storm there. ^_^  I've never been that enamoured of Peter Cook, he always comes across as being too clever by half and a bit... I dunno... hard-hearted. :-\  But here, he demonstrates how alluring aloofness can be!  Is anyone else swooning...?

Mustn't forget, though, that Dudley Moore composed the score.  All the music is great, from start to finish.

The whole film (Bedazzled) is really good, much better by far than the remake.  Even though it's funny and the humour is quite silly in places (trampolining nuns, anyone?!), it has a melancholy quality to it, too.  I suppose even in the super-optimistic 60s, not everybody felt that the times they were a-changin' for the better.  We may have grand ideas and noble aims in this life, but what if all the involuntary, petty, split-second moments of anger, cruelty, venality and greed that pepper our larger strivings add up to damnation?  If not perhaps in any kind of afterlife, they probably do in this one...  If the road to Hell really is paved with good intentions, this film puts that across really well - be careful (and very precise about) what you wish for, folks! ;-)

And in the meantime, distracting oneself with amusing films and clever musical parodies is as soothing a balm as I have yet found. ^_^
songofcopper: (Tea is the drink of great detectives! :-)
I just pre-ordered this.  Gotta have it! ^_^  I have A LOT of Popol Vuh in MP3 format only, which is fine for train journeys and other introspective moments with headphones, but annoying when you just want to play a record... 5 CD albums in a nice box will definitely help with that. :-)

Also, I find it impossible to keep up with proper, studious listening with downloaded music.  It's so quick and easy to get that you've often acquired 3 more albums before you've even had time to listen to the first one.  That is not conducive to music appreciation. ;-)  I miss the days of being a student - making my first life-changing musical discoveries, often having to search for a good while to find what I wanted, or send for it mail order.  The internet did exist but there wasn't the constant access to it that we have now.  (Heck, for the first year I didn't even have a phone in my room - or a mobile phone.  Remember queueing for the phone kiosk with phone cards, anyone?!)  Plus, what internet there was tended to be very basic and consisted mostly of flashing yellow text on a purple background, for no apparent reason. >_<

Oh dear.  Now I feel old!!

Anyway... let me once again recommend Popol Vuh.  It's perfect music for when you want virtuosity tempered by humility - melody tempered by melancholy - strangeness tempered by comfort.  Very soothing and ethereal, but doesn't drift too far into 'New Age noodling'. ;-)  Although the lyrics, when present, make mention of religious themes, much of it is instrumental; also, the spiritual element comes across as being so personal and specific to the people who made the music, so sincere, matter-of-fact and non-judgemental, that it doesn't detract from the listening experience even if you're a confirmed atheist.  Also, forget the label of 'Krautrock', since that typically tends to refer to more cerebral, sardonic and radical music.

Here's a video for your entertainment.




songofcopper: (Tea is the drink of great detectives! :-)
I just pre-ordered this.  Gotta have it! ^_^  I have A LOT of Popol Vuh in MP3 format only, which is fine for train journeys and other introspective moments with headphones, but annoying when you just want to play a record... 5 CD albums in a nice box will definitely help with that. :-)

Also, I find it impossible to keep up with proper, studious listening with downloaded music.  It's so quick and easy to get that you've often acquired 3 more albums before you've even had time to listen to the first one.  That is not conducive to music appreciation. ;-)  I miss the days of being a student - making my first life-changing musical discoveries, often having to search for a good while to find what I wanted, or send for it mail order.  The internet did exist but there wasn't the constant access to it that we have now.  (Heck, for the first year I didn't even have a phone in my room - or a mobile phone.  Remember queueing for the phone kiosk with phone cards, anyone?!)  Plus, what internet there was tended to be very basic and consisted mostly of flashing yellow text on a purple background, for no apparent reason. >_<

Oh dear.  Now I feel old!!

Anyway... let me once again recommend Popol Vuh.  It's perfect music for when you want virtuosity tempered by humility - melody tempered by melancholy - strangeness tempered by comfort.  Very soothing and ethereal, but doesn't drift too far into 'New Age noodling'. ;-)  Although the lyrics, when present, make mention of religious themes, much of it is instrumental; also, the spiritual element comes across as being so personal and specific to the people who made the music, so sincere, matter-of-fact and non-judgemental, that it doesn't detract from the listening experience even if you're a confirmed atheist.  Also, forget the label of 'Krautrock', since that typically tends to refer to more cerebral, sardonic and radical music.

Here's a video for your entertainment.




songofcopper: (Purrodigy)
...for thee interlecktualz amongst you! ;-)

(Or, in actual ENGLISH, A Musical Interlude!)

Someone sent me a link to this video and I just had to share it.  I am not well-versed in the music of Yes, but let's just say I'm the kind of girl you can successfully woo to a soundtrack of Tales From Topographic Oceans. >_<

Ok, have at it:


Wow, the man sure can play.  David kindly played me the original recording for comparison and it seems pretty spot-on to me! :-)

Notice to Patrons: there could be another music-related post in the offing - if I can come up with some words that actually make sense, that is. ^_^

songofcopper: (Purrodigy)
...for thee interlecktualz amongst you! ;-)

(Or, in actual ENGLISH, A Musical Interlude!)

Someone sent me a link to this video and I just had to share it.  I am not well-versed in the music of Yes, but let's just say I'm the kind of girl you can successfully woo to a soundtrack of Tales From Topographic Oceans. >_<

Ok, have at it:


Wow, the man sure can play.  David kindly played me the original recording for comparison and it seems pretty spot-on to me! :-)

Notice to Patrons: there could be another music-related post in the offing - if I can come up with some words that actually make sense, that is. ^_^

songofcopper: (cary grant & katharine hepburn <3)
Good morning LJ.

I have an invitation for you: take a moment or two and enjoy these two snippets - the bookends to my musical life. ;-)

First... Fred Astaire.  I'm sure there are some groan-inducing racial stereotypes on display here (an entirely black workforce... hmm... keeping jolly with some nice music... ye-es...) but let's not worry about that.  Just listen to the good advice herein (SLAP THAT BASS!!!  I do hope that's not a euphemism...) and enjoy the elegant embodiment of syncopation that is Fred.  I swear he is the reason why I find rhythm so damn fascinatin'. ;-)  Also... if I was a man, I would totally dress the 1930s way.  (I sometimes do anyway - wide legged flannel trousers and co-respondent shoes are the way forward!  Très garçonne, non?)


(Link here in case of embedding nightmares...)

Parte Deux: Philippe Bussonnet.  (Oh yes, him again... sorry chaps!)  Here he is doing what he does best.  I shall be (hopefully, barring any mishap) in Paris in February, experiencing this live!  Oh my god!!  I may FAINT. ;-)


(Once again, here's a link in case of zargleglarble.)

There you have it!  A short journey from Then to Now, across some strings. ;-)

[NB: I was finding Youtube irksome earlier - irksome and vexatious.  If it says 'This video is no longer available', insult it freely and then follow the links.  Keeping hitting 'refresh' until it becomes less coy. ;-)]

Now... go and have yourselves a lovely day. ^_^

songofcopper: (cary grant & katharine hepburn <3)
Good morning LJ.

I have an invitation for you: take a moment or two and enjoy these two snippets - the bookends to my musical life. ;-)

First... Fred Astaire.  I'm sure there are some groan-inducing racial stereotypes on display here (an entirely black workforce... hmm... keeping jolly with some nice music... ye-es...) but let's not worry about that.  Just listen to the good advice herein (SLAP THAT BASS!!!  I do hope that's not a euphemism...) and enjoy the elegant embodiment of syncopation that is Fred.  I swear he is the reason why I find rhythm so damn fascinatin'. ;-)  Also... if I was a man, I would totally dress the 1930s way.  (I sometimes do anyway - wide legged flannel trousers and co-respondent shoes are the way forward!  Très garçonne, non?)


(Link here in case of embedding nightmares...)

Parte Deux: Philippe Bussonnet.  (Oh yes, him again... sorry chaps!)  Here he is doing what he does best.  I shall be (hopefully, barring any mishap) in Paris in February, experiencing this live!  Oh my god!!  I may FAINT. ;-)


(Once again, here's a link in case of zargleglarble.)

There you have it!  A short journey from Then to Now, across some strings. ;-)

[NB: I was finding Youtube irksome earlier - irksome and vexatious.  If it says 'This video is no longer available', insult it freely and then follow the links.  Keeping hitting 'refresh' until it becomes less coy. ;-)]

Now... go and have yourselves a lovely day. ^_^

Todd is Godd!

Tuesday, 11 March 2008 20:59
songofcopper: (rrrrred)
Oh my word!

The 1970s!

Todd Rundgren's Utopia!

Bombast, high jinks, lean guitar gods scaling replica pyramids in skin tight lycra whilst playing a suggestively-shaped guitar... *swoon*! (Prince was a Todd Rundgren fan, you know...)

Well, here it is. Just be grateful it's not the entire song. ;-)

Todd is Godd!

Tuesday, 11 March 2008 20:59
songofcopper: (rrrrred)
Oh my word!

The 1970s!

Todd Rundgren's Utopia!

Bombast, high jinks, lean guitar gods scaling replica pyramids in skin tight lycra whilst playing a suggestively-shaped guitar... *swoon*! (Prince was a Todd Rundgren fan, you know...)

Well, here it is. Just be grateful it's not the entire song. ;-)

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This journal is not a private diary, it is more like an occasional, imaginary column. Therefore, much of it is on public display. However, if you want to read my occasional attempts at creative writing, my Caution Elf tells me I should only show that stuff to my friends. You know what to do. :-)

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